Caviar – food of the gods and relished by lesser mortals too. For centuries the salted roe of the sturgeon has been highly prized and treasured by the great and the good. Ancient Phoenicians used it to sustain them in times of war and famine; Pliny and 5Ovid sung it’s praises 53in their verse; and the Russian Tsars and Emperors of Manchuria reserved it greedily and wisely for themselves. To this day, Caviar remains undoubtedly the most sought after, exclusive and exquisite delicacy in the world.

Caviar is a natural food derived from a fish that ranges enormously in individual species, age and habitat. Today it is available in a wide range of quality, colour and flavour.

A key question to many is often which variety of caviar is the best. To professionals in the caviar business , this is rather like asking whether you prefer sole, salmon or trout- it all depends on personal preference, mood, circumstances. Perhaps your dealer has better Oscietra than Sevruga in stock, or vice versa. Many claim that’s black Beluga with large eggs is the best; others insist that a grey egg is the only good colour. In reality there is no difference in the quality- the colour of the eggs depends on the individual fish. Beluga is certainly the rarest and this makes it the most expensive, but not necessarily ‘the best’ . Many professionals prize new- season Sevruga above all others. The French who are great consumers of Caviar eat the most Oscietra, while older generations , Eastern Europeans and Russians prefer pressed caviar.

Above all, caviar is about pure pleasure. It is about spoiling yourself, indulgence and relaxing with one of the most sensual, irresistible and exquisite tastes in life.

ALMAS White caviar is something for elitists- very hard to acquire and therefore a curiosity.

BELUGA Caspian fishermen dream of catching a great Beluga- it is tantamount to finding a diamond in the desert.

SEVRUGA
Small, dark and distinctive. Sevruga is the choice of those who like their eggs full of taste and flavour.

OSCIETRA The most intriguing fish, with more subtle ranges of flavour, size and colour in her eggs than any other sturgeon.